Nonfiction November 2017: Book Pairing

Nonfiction November 2017: Book Pairing

It's time for week two of Nonfiction November! I'm thrilled to be joining in again this year, thanks to hosts Sarah at Sarah's Book Shelves, Katie at Doing Dewey, Lory at Emerald City Book Review, Kim at Sophisticated Dorkiness, and Julz at Julz Reads

If you are interested in joining in, make sure to check out the prompts here and head over to Sarah's Book Shelves to link up your post.

This week, we are tasked with pairing a fiction title with a nonfiction title and, since I am SUPER excited that We Were the Lucky Ones, by Georgia Hunter, has been nominated in the Best Debut category of the 2017 Goodreads Choice Awards, I thought I would start there. 

Even now, months after I originally posted it, my review seems lacking; I cannot say enough complimentary things about this novel...YOU MUST READ IT. 

The time period during which the novel is set, from the early beginnings of World War II through its near conclusion on V-Day, is one of my all-time favorites. I wrote my graduate thesis on a little known, yet oft-supported,  theory that Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa was recruited by German forces to incite the involvement of the United States in World War II, prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. I digress! 

One of the nonfiction titles I've been excited to read is The Girls of Atomic City by Denise Kiernan. I'm pairing these two because they involve a historical time period that I love and they have some interesting similarities; however, the stories told are from very different perspectives which, for me, is what makes the similarities so striking. 

  • Highly researched; both authors spent several years gathering information
  • Include stories from primary sources, people who were closely involved with the details
  • Set in the wonderous, yet frightening, time of WWII when news is scarce and community rumors are the most reliable source of information
  • Employment is abundant, due to wartime industry, but racism prevails when it comes to job placement (in both the U.S. and in Europe). 
  • Both stories highlight the fact that World War II touched everyone; no one was left unaffected
  • None of the changes, or circumstances that might seem shocking to us now, came quickly; people consistently made small adjustments and kept going, unaware of the bigger catastrophe at hand
  • Most are on a similar mission: to do the best they can do for their families, and their country, during this traumatic time
  • Each are highly inspiring tales of perseverance through extraordinary circumstances and a devastating period in our history

Even if this time period does not necessarily appeal to you, I would highly recommend these two! Both of these books are not only relevant to our current social and political climate, but also demonstrate that the human condition is the same no matter which side of a conflict or struggle one might find themselves. If you haven't already read them, I hope you'll add these to your list! 

An Update from the (Previously) Injured Runner

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