Golden Child by Claire Adam

Golden Child by Claire Adam

Golden Child.jpg

Golden Child
by Claire Adam
Hardcover, 288 pages
SJP for Hogarth (January 29, 2019)
Advance reader’s copy provided by publisher

There are so many thoughts I could share about my experience of Golden Child but, in the interest of maintaining a spoiler-free post, I’ll restrict myself to the elements of the novel that were most impactful while attempting to refrain from giving anything away.

One of the most important things readers should know, when and if you decide to read this beautiful debut, is that you will definitely want to talk to someone after you finish! Golden Child is the perfect book club or small group discussion selection; there is plenty of fodder for conversation and, as I have already discovered, most readers have very distinct views on the novel’s conclusion.

They have two kinds of men in the world, Clyde thinks, two kinds of fathers. One kind works hard and brings all the money home and gives it to his wife to spend on the house and children. The other kind doesn’t do that. And nobody can control which kind of father they get. Simple as that.

The setting of this book, rural Trinidad in the 1980s-1990s, is key to understanding the cultural influences on the narrative; author Claire Adam is a remarkable storyteller, but her descriptions of the landscape and diversity are absolutely incredible. In addition, I love that each character has a very distinct personality; each seem to simultaneously fight against and embrace their individual identities and purpose within the family unit.

Again, I don’t feel comfortable sharing much about the way in which the story unfolds; nevertheless, this is a heavy read, especially the second half of the book, and you will likely have strong opinions - some may be positive and some may be negative. In either case, there is a certain spiritual quality and a level of respect that comes with the conclusion of this story; you may love it, you may hate it, but I hope you can appreciate its value. I believe that it is most definitely worth reading.



January 2019

January 2019

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